Panel no. 39 - Reanimation: From Heritage Production to Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett's Academic Legacy


Convenor

Title Dr First name Jonathan Last name Skinner
Institution University of Roehampton City London Country GB

Co-Convenor

Title Dr First name Magdalena Last name Banaszkiewicz
Institution name Jagiellonian University City Krakow Country PL

Panel

Panel title

Reanimation: From Heritage Production to Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett's Academic Legacy

Panel abstract

This panel is interested in conceptual and empirical papers interrogating the idea of "reanimation". Rhythms of the lived body, humans and heritage sites brought back to life, humanistic disciplines persisting in a deterministic world: such is the reanimation of people and places and ideas. This panel seeks to explore the idea of reanimation in the context of heritage production and reproduction - as well as the application, legacy, impact and potential use of Kirshenblatt-Gimblett's work on the topic. Author of Destination Culture, theorist in ethnomusicology and heritage, controversialist on Jewish identity, and performance scholar of places and peoples, Kirshenblatt-Gimblett's work is interdisciplinary and touches on anthropological scholarship in different ways. This panel seeks to engage with reanimation in museum studies, the anthropology of tourism, and the anthropology of the body, as well as Kirshenblatt-Gimblett's work on the concept as a virtual second life. Does reanimation eradicate the past or bring it to life? Is it necessarily virtual - a second life for place or an object renarrated (or "transvaluated", as Kirshenblatt-Gimblett suggests); a presence in the absence of the past? Are tourists infused by an imaginative virtual in their visits and, if so, what of the locals? Does reanimation restore to life or infuse new life, asks Tom Mels, and does this only take place in a tourist landscape? We welcome a diversity of papers broadly engaging with this important concept.

IUAES Commission

IUAES Commission on Anthropology of Tourism