Panel no. 100 - Exploring the Gap Between Knowledge, Policy and Practice. Contributions to Anthropology of Disaster & Climate Change Worldwide with Special Stress on the Global South


Convenor

Title Dr First name Virginia Last name García-Acosta
Institution CIESAS City Mexico City Country MX

Co-Convenor

Title Dr First name Susanna Last name Hoffman
Institution name Independent Researcher City New York Country US

Panel

Panel title

Exploring the Gap Between Knowledge, Policy and Practice. Contributions to Anthropology of Disaster & Climate Change Worldwide with Special Stress on the Global South

Panel abstract

In 2020 the co-chairs of the IUAES Risk and Disaster Commission, Susanna M. Hoffman and Virginia García-Acosta, saw the publication of three critical books they had edited and contributed to: "Disaster upon disaster", "The Anthropology of Disasters in Latin America" and "The Angry Earth" (2nd edition). This panel tries to combine the main contributions included in those books. Topics can be divided into two main "umbrellas": (1) Defining disaster upon disaster: why risk prevention and disaster response so often fail? The gap between knowledge policy and practice that results in natural hazard events becoming disasters: views from looking at groups of stakeholders, practitioners, advocacy, gender, and so on. Humanitarian response: ideals meet reality. Slow on-set disaster. Resettlement for disaster risk reduction: global knowledge, local application. The scope and importance of anthropology and its core concept of culture in closing the risk and disaster knowledge to policy and practice gap. Applying the anthropology of disaster to practitioner settings and policy creation. Future matter matters: disasters as a (potential) vehicle for social change. (2) Anthropological insights into disasters coming from the Global South still constitutes a gap. Contributions recently published for Latin America can be a starting point to discuss how research, based on ethnography, participant observation, and field research coming from a broader Global South, can help to assess public policies, and help the Global North to learn more about different anthropological disastrous experiences. Explore what the gaps are between studies on disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation, and sustainable development from an anthropological perspective. What are their connections and differences? Is this fragmentation useful when we are talking about application in such critical issues as disaster risk reduction? Multi-disciplinary insights and contributions are welcome.

IUAES Commission

IUAES Commission on Anthropology of Risk and Disasters