Reviewed
Reviewer MIBANEZANGULO | Review

#321 “Make them invisible… and then they actually disappear”: The impact of everyday bordering on young refugees’ post-compulsory education in Greece


Coresponding author's contact details

First name Lucy Middle name Last name Hunt
Title Ms Organization / Institution University of Oxford Department Department of Education
Address 15 Norham Gardens Postal / Zip code OX2 6PY Country GB
E-Mail Hidden Phone number Hidden Presenting author Yes

Co-authors (0)

No Co-authors found.

Abstract

Abstract title

“Make them invisible… and then they actually disappear”: The impact of everyday bordering on young refugees’ post-compulsory education in Greece

Abstract text

This paper addresses the social consequences of the financial and ‘refugee’ crises in Greece, and particularly how they impact the post-compulsory (15+) educational trajectories of young refugees and asylum seekers in the country. It argues that even after youth have been permitted entry to the country and the space of the high school or university - including in legal frameworks - they still exist in a ‘gray space’ (Yiftachel, 2009) in which they are subject to everyday bordering practices (Yuval-Davis, Wemyss & Cassidy, 2018). In this paper, it is argued that these bordering practices (attempt to) govern young refugees’ visibility and voice – rendering them ‘hypervisible’, invisible and/or silent – and as such, constitute subtle but powerful forms of exclusion. These can cause young refugees to feel unwelcome and unable to participate, resulting in them dropping out and/or readjusting their ambitions. The paper aims to make these bordering processes visible and highlight young refugees’ methods of overcoming them: such as by (collectively) seeking out alternative educational spaces which allow them to be seen and heard as they wish. In doing so, it builds on recent work which explores how everyday borders are created, maintained and overcome in education; how schools function as ‘borderlands’; and how educational staff can act as gatekeepers to the new society (e.g. Feuerverger, 2011; Pace, 2017; Oliver & Hughes, 2018). It is based on data generated over eight months of ethnographic doctoral fieldwork with refugees in Thessaloniki, involving participant observation as a volunteer teacher.

Conference topic

Panel no. 108 - Refuge Refugees and Forced Migration

Preferred format

Oral

Abstract Review

This abstract was reviewed on 2021-01-05 16:30h by MIBANEZANGULO

Reviewer decision

Accepted