Reviewed
Reviewer rms2020 | Review

#297 Ecological and cultural aspects of the introduction of non-human primates in insular environments beyond their homeland


Coresponding author's contact details

First name Cecilia Middle name Last name Veracini
Title Dr. Organization / Institution University of Lisbon Department ISCSP - CAPP
Address Rua Almerindo Lessa Postal / Zip code 1300-663 Country PT
E-Mail Hidden Phone number Hidden Presenting author Yes

Co-authors (1)

Co-Auhtor #1

First name Masseti Middle name Last name Marco
Title Dr. Organization / Institution University of Florence Department Department of Biology
Country IT E-Mail Hidden Presenting author No

Abstract

Abstract title

Ecological and cultural aspects of the introduction of non-human primates in insular environments beyond their homeland

Abstract text

Since antiquity non-human primates were introduced in many places beyond their homeland. Insular environments, as a consequence of their ecological isolation, are typically more affected by the arrival of one or more exotic species. A preliminary survey has shown that the species introduced by humans in these environments are approx. 12. Among the best known species we find the Asian Crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis) introduced in many places, such as Mauritius and some islands of Indonesia; the African (Chlorocebus sabaeus), introduced in Cabo Verde and West Indian islands; the capuchin monkeys (Sapajus apella) introduced in Margarita Island in Venezuela and the common marmoset, (Callithrix jacchus), native of the Northeast of Brazil, released in some small Islands of the Rio de Janeiro state. Different historical periods and various motivations characterized the introduction of these species. Some of these primates are today considered pests and they can damage or compete with the local fauna (e.g. the common marmoset predates an high number of bird’s nests). Others, who have lived in these ecosystems for thousand or hundred years, are today part of the trophic chains and have also important roles in the local humans’ cultures. This paper aims to discuss the symbolical and biological role of non-human primates in insular environments considered both as invaders and/or victims of humans’ exploitation. It will be compared the context of contemporary and old civilizations, the cultural and religious value of primates and their adaptation and resilience in a highly anthropic world.

Conference topic

Panel no. 50 - Invasiveness: Knowledges, Constructions and Representations of Invasive Species

Preferred format

Oral

Abstract Review

This abstract was reviewed on 2020-10-16 16:56h by rms2020

Reviewer decision

Accepted